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Nigerian Yarns

“I’m black. I don’t need sunscreen.”

If I had a dollar for every time I have heard this I would be chilling by the seaside in Seychelles, sipping a cocktail and competing with Alhaji Dangote for his position on the Forbes list.

A lot of us (black folks) don’t think that we need to wear sunscreen. The argument is that our melanin protects us from the sun and the havoc it can wreak. Parts of that statement are correct but it is not correct in totality. Sun exposure can lead to a range of conditions from hyperpigmentation of the skin all the way to skin cancer. While melanin does protect Africans (and those of African descent) from the sun’s rays more than, say, an Asian or European, it only gives about SPF13-SPF15 protection and this doesn’t block the harmful effects of the sun.

There can be abnormal melanocytes formed and distributed in the skin. This is called dyspigmentation.

If you take nothing away from this post, please take this away: black people can and do suffer from skin cancer.

Gari

Last weekend, the picture below started making its way around social media with a lot of people asking why NAFDAC would permit Garri to be imported into the country.

I have a few things to say:

I know that at this point, we are horrified, especially with the state of the economy, and we are looking for someone to blame but NAFDAC’s job does not involve deciding what to let in and what not to. They regulate Food and Drug Products in terms of their manufacture. They are just to determine whether the companies that are bringing in these products are doing a good job of manufacturing. C’est fini! We need to find another whipping boy to blame for permitting this into the country.

The idea of a new series on the blog came up a few weeks ago when I went to the market and posted a picture of something I found which I had no previous knowledge of. It was dried okro. I had never seen it before, certainly never tasted it. I came across it by happenstance as I ventured into a part of the market I had never been in before. It never occurred to me that anyone would dry okro, since the fresh ones are always available. 

Katharine Natural Nigerian

A few months ago, I received a mail from a reader asking me for the English names of some items she had come across in a Northern Nigeria market. 
 
A few mails back and forth and I decided that I definitely had to interview her so that I could share with you some of her natural lifestyle practices. Easy to incorporate into your daily life and it will make a big impact not only in your life but also in the environment. 
 
The first thing you will probably notice is that Katharine is very tall. Lol! Actually, you will notice that she is an Oyinbo so we are making her an "honorary" Natural Nigerian!  Make sure you read it all, she shares some really interesting things about how we can live Naturally in Nigeria. 

We are a 100% Nigerian female owned business that has been instrumental in building the Natural lifestyle community in Nigeria. Our products are inspired by beauty, sourced from nature and backed by science.
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